Tag Archives: grief

Resurrection

My mother and her two best friends, Evelyn and Bubbles, were inseparable. They knew each other as young wives in Chicago, having been introduced by their husbands who went to high school together. In the photo, Leonard is leaning in … Continue reading

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My Addiction

My Addiction I’m addicted to ancestry.com. It started innocently with a free two-week membership and an occasional quick search every couple of days. But then an hour or two of researching turned into five, six, or seven. It became a … Continue reading

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HOMAGE TO MY FATHER

HOMAGE TO MY FATHER The last time I wished my father dead, I meant it. I was on a plane home to Phoenix after visiting him in Buffalo Grove, Illinois, where he was in his final stage of life. As … Continue reading

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Sliver of Sky

Sliver of Sky by Terry Ratner, RN, MFA Send comments to info@terryratner.com I knew ahead of time the exact route I’d take that evening. I needed no GPS or verbal directions to the restaurant where a group of writers were … Continue reading

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WINDOW SHOPPING

  In the ‘90s, after my son, Sky, died in a motorcycle accident, while I was in the depths of my worse dreaminess, I began to order as many catalogs as I could. At least thirty mail order catalogues came … Continue reading

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TEN THINGS \ Part Three

TEN THINGS PART-THREE TEN As a young man, he called to tell you he was sick with the flu. You were concerned and asked him if he had any food in the house.  “No, I haven’t been eating much,” he … Continue reading

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TEN THINGS \ Part One

TEN THINGS By Terry Ratner, RN, MFA These are ten things only you know now. ONE He joked that he would die young. You imagined ninety to one hundred. But “young” ended up meaning twenty-five. In the memory book the … Continue reading

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